Friday, January 16, 2009

Energy Management, Indeed

So do you suppose the simulators will all have a "Sullenberger" scenario loaded soon?

Hot damn...what an amazing moment in a life...

And yes, he's not the only one on that flight to applaud but, frankly, if he hadn't put it down that way, no one else would have had a chance to be heroic.

Mad skills...

4 comments:

D.W. said...

I was explaining how awesome this was to a coworker this morning. Capt. Sullenberger realized that he was grossly over his landing weight and didn't have time to dump fuel (which would have landed all over midtown Manhattan) so a landing at any airport would likely have ended in disaster. So the water option was actually the most survivable scenario. However, the beautiful execution of the landing just goes to show the pilot's amazing energy management skills (likely gained from flying the F-4 and gliders).

This pilot should never have to pay for a beer again. EVER.

Further, if anyone ever tries to tell you that God doesn't watch over us, remind them of this event, and then smack them in the forehead... :-)

Joan of Argghh! said...

Neo-neocon has such an amazing roundup about this man. Check it out.

Actually there's a couple of posts there worth seeing.

Seems he's been training all his life for yesterday. Good lookin', too!

Ed Rasimus said...

Absolutely no doubt that they will have the Sully profile as mandatory. It was the same after the Iowa City accident with regard to assymetric throttle and power management to control an aircraft without hydraulics or the Chicago DC-10 with an engine flying off the wing shortly after lift-off where they learned the fighter pilot basic of "unload for control" rather than slow to Vmc.

Every incident leads to learning (or relearning) and the advantage of high performance experience even in heavy jets occasionally manifests itself.

Sully did an incredible job under remakarkable circumstances. So did the rest of the flight crew and the passengers who acted like mature, rational, non-self-centered adults.

It gives one hope for the future.

LauraB said...

As always, Ed, honored to have ya.

A good friend said he once flew a simulator - told me it was like flying an apartment building with wings.

I never forgot that...how different it must be from the aircraft you knew...and yet how important those skills are, even in an "apartment bldg".