Sunday, August 16, 2009

Life On The Road

That's what I just saw...some poor woman's entire set of possessions scattered here and there in the warm Texas grass on the side of the highway in the middle of nowhere. The poor woman - she had a 64 ft moving van filled to the brim with all she had. One of those wild Texas winds snatched up the thing and gave it a shove. It being top heavy, there was only one result possible.

She is fortunate to have walked away. Oh, she's wounded to the core, I imagine - but the crazed flipping and flopping left her with a cut arm, I hear. The rest of her things...well, they didn't survive the trip.

A late dinner planned, I heard the call-out even as he was telling me he was almost home. I just sighed, knowing when it says CMV that it isn't going to be fast or easy. Much later, he called. Some dithering between us, I finally reminded him there was nowhere else to get a meal except where I was. The staff at McD's kicked out a dozen burgers with alacrity.

Even so, it took a good 40 minutes to get there. Darker than - as he says - 4 foot up a bulls ass...and a road that has no divider with oncoming traffic just a narrow 6 inch stripe away. We both detest that arrangement but it is what it is.

I was glad to have packed the cool, wet washcloths for mopping off the sweat and grime before eating. All the guys were there, needing every light they had to just illuminate the scene, the road, and to keep another wreck from happening.

I picked my way through it all, my own flashlight giving flashes of the furniture all strewn about. I could not help but wonder about her...if she was having "I told you so" moments in her mind, not wanting to move anyway. And how to unload all your things in some new place and have to pick through it all to get what was salvagable? The loss would come again with every opened box.

Thankfully, the rental company had another truck coming and a set of movers were on-scene when I left, staging the items along the roadside to speed up the loading process when the replacement truck arrived. A driver, too, was there, waiting and a tow truck to take his personal vehicle home, I assume. I could not help but think back to our own experience with the same agency and how pleased we'd been. Admittedly, we both have a flinch reaction to the yellow panels when they drive past. It was a rather heinous 23 hour straight through drive.

But I cannot imagine it otherwise - if it had happened and she had no one and nothing...no way to get the things off the road and off to her new abode. I suppose in this case it really could have been worse.

4 comments:

lucy said...

My heart goes out to this woman.

leeann said...

We're packing to move as we speak.
This post will give me nightmares until we reach our destination. Poor lady, I hope she'll be okay.

copswife said...

What awful luck! So many people move and get safely to thier destinations. Just a gust of wind changed that for her. Wonder if she had any kind of insurance that would cover the losses ...

LauraB said...

Thanks, all! L, be very careful and quite willing to take it slow. Haste makes a great deal of waste...

Hey, C! We figured she MUST have had something because the rental company sent out the tow truck, packers, and a new van. But I'll be finding out more later...

Thanks, Lucy - I never saw her and hubby says she never returned to the scene so I imagine family got her stitched up and in a bed...

It is a very dangerous and frightening world these days. The accident was a reminder of just how close we all are to losing everything to a change in winds...